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Tel Aviv Vintage Digger’s Guide – Part 2.

Next vintage lover’s must visit spot is nothing else but Jaffa Flea Market, or how we kindly call it Pishpeshuk. We’ve already gave you advice where to shop for treasures in the city center in our Part 1 of Tel Aviv Vintage Digger’s Guide, so this time we are going down to Old Jaffa. To catch some through-time inspiration and endless fun, save the whole day for this la-la-land adventure, and I’d advice you to visit shuk-ha-pishpeshim during the week, if only you are not a fan of crowded places.  Call me budget fashion adept, sales hunter, dusty retro-chic stuff digger. I adore flea markets and totally recommend this entertainment as a must when you travel, the local atmosphere is amazing, besides it’s never boring, and don’t forget – deeper you look – greater pieces you can find!

Generally, you can find here anything starting from cheap old books, someone’s old family photos, old fashioned furniture your grandparents might still have, some unique stuff like old street name signboards, stunning retro jewelry pieces and so. Besides cheap trash and some really weird items on the shelves of open market, this Pishpeshuk area is fully stuffed with trendy lil cafes and designer jewelry studios. Anyway, it’s impossible to keep your head concentrated in that mad old junk jumble without big green salad and cold limonana. Go to Puah (Rabi Yohanan str.3) to have your lunch – second hand furniture, retro dishes and beautiful atmosphere provided. Italkiya on the corner of Oley Zion is also pretty good, handmade pasta and red checkered table clothes can’t be bad:) Have fun and let us know about your findings!:)

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American-German Colony – well hidden spot in Tel Aviv.

   Every city has it’s own secrets, that only insiders can show and Tel Aviv is not an exception. Guidebooks barely could help you to explore the city’s atmosphere and true vibes, but we, Telavivians, surely can. And today I am taking you to a quiet walk to a very special place.

   I’ve been living in Florentine neighborhood for more than a year and only few days ago have discovered an adorable spot between the Florentine and Yaffo, called American-German Colony. The colony was founded in 19th century by americans, then came german settlements and what we have now is a green spot in the city center with a unique historical print, some very well kept secrets and that “Jerusalem atmosphere” you can catch in the silence of the neighborhood. You can spot here beautiful Lutheran Immanuel Church with a temple that basically brought me here (it can be seen both from Florentine and beachside), Meine Freundship House with a little museum inside, Immanuel House that served as the main office of the Temple Society and other interesting buildings. Don’t need to be genius to realize that this mix of unique architecture and historical heritage that is sharing the space at the moment with car-repair garages and some ruins, will be renovated into luxury village sooner than you think. That is why the perfect time to visit the area is right now, since it keeps the original mood of American colony and not overcrowded with tourists and restaurants these days. Totally recommended to visit this area at sunset time when colors are smooth and soft so you can feel the calmest atmosphere there, as I luckily did.

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American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv cats

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv

American-German Colony Tel Aviv cat

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Tel Aviv ranked Second Best StartUp City in the World

Israel technology is being feted after the events of last week. The Iron Dome was able to successfully protect Israeli citizens by shooting down many of the rockets that were raining down on them.

There is no doubt that Israel is one of the technological capitals of the world. A recent study just ranked it as the number two startup ecosystem by Startup Genome.

Just behind Silicon Valley, Tel Aviv out-trumped bigger hubs such as Los Angeles, Seattle, New York, London and Sydney.

This is no secret – Israel is known at the Start-Up Nation. Start ups such as Waze, Kaltura, Mobli, StartApp, Rounds, Onavo and Gigya have established that Israeli punches above its weight.

In its own right, Tel Aviv is a beautiful city. It sits on the Mediterranean Sea. If you want a cosmopolitan lifestyle that takes the best of all elements, Tel Aviv would be the city for you. Some of the hotels in Tel Aviv are some of the best in the world. It has some incredible restaurants that showcase every cuisine in the world.

For those who like the outdoors, there are parks and walks. There are lots of tracks for cyclists and those who love being on the water will love the surfing and sailing.

Like New York, London, Paris and other great cities of the world, there is a sense of energy in Tel Aviv that something is always happening. It has a great vibe to it.
There is something about the Israeli mentality that sees it really identify with the concept of the Start Up. It is about being creative and having the desire to do something better and in a more innovative fashion.

There is actually a connection between the army and the Start-Up culture. Many Israeli start-ups have risen from relationships forged in the army. Soldiers who have served together have then worked together in civilian life.

The values they had in the army translate very well in the business world. This could be a reason why Israeli start-ups have an advantage. Elsewhere in the world, when people join a company they may just see it a job. They don’t identify with the core values or objectives of it. They arrive at 9, leave at 5 and that’s it.

But the Israeli start-ups may not roll like that. Like in the army, people are constantly striving to improve and do better. There is an emphasis of clear, direct lines of communication and a real sense of teamwork. This urgency allows them to succeed.